Benchmarking Raspberry Pi GPIO Speed

UPDATE2: You may also want to check out my Raspberry 2 vs 1 GPIO benchmark!

UPDATED: 2015-02-15! This article has been very popular, so I’ve now updated all the benchmarks using the latest firmware and library versions. The scope has also been upgraded to a PicoScope 5444B with better resolution and bandwith than the earlier models. :)

main2015

Don’t try this at home! Shorting GND and VCC with a probe might fry your Pi and more!

Method and Summary of Results

The basic test setup was to toggle one of the GPIO pins between zero and one as fast as possible. GPIO 4 was selected due to easy access and no overlapping functionality. This is basically the “upper limit” for any signalling one can hope to achieve with the GPIO pins – real-life scenarios where processing needs to be done would need to aim for some fraction of these values. Here are the current results:

Language Library Tested / version Square wave
Shell /proc/mem access 2015-02-14 2.8 kHz
Shell / gpio utility WiringPi gpio utility 2015-02-15 / 2.25 40 Hz
Python RPi.GPIO 2015-02-15 / 0.5.10 70 kHz
Python wiringpi2 bindings 2015-02-15 / latest github 28 kHz
Ruby wiringpi bindings 2015-02-15 / latest gem (1.1.0) 21 kHz
C Native library 2015-02-15 / latest RaspPi wiki code 22 MHz
C BCM 2835 2015-02-15 / 1.38 5.4 MHz
C wiringPi 2015-02-15 / 2.25 4.1 – 4.6 MHz
Perl BCM 2835 2015-02-15 / 1.9 48 kHz

Shell script

The easiest way to manipulate the Pi GPIO pins is via console. Here’s a simple shell script to toggle the GPIO 4 as fast as possible (add sleep 1 after both to get a nice LED toggle test):

#!/bin/sh

echo "4" > /sys/class/gpio/export
echo "out" > /sys/class/gpio/gpio4/direction

while true
do
	echo 1 > /sys/class/gpio/gpio4/value
	echo 0 > /sys/class/gpio/gpio4/value
done

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