Picoscope Beta for Linux

Picoscope for Linux

Tux logo by Larry Ewing, Simon Budig, Anja Gerwinski

I’ve been a big fan of Picotech’s USB connected PC oscilloscopes ever since I purchased my first PicoScope 2204 almost two years ago. I liked the compact form factor on my desk a lot, and the powerful Picoscope software for Windows – Picotech makes only one version of this software so you get the same functionality with a £159 ($260) 2204 scope as a £5,995 ($9,900) PicoScope 6407 user would – although of course the scope features would be wildly different.

Now Picoscope is a great piece of Windows software and as I generally use Win7 to avoid reboots every time I want to use Photoshop or play a session of Mass Effect, it’s been perfect for me. However, quite a few of electronics enthusiasts are also big advocates of open software movement, and while Picotech has had drivers and SDK for Linux for a while to implement things like my realtime composite decoder, the fact that there is no Linux version of the oscilloscope software has been unfortunate. So when I noticed in the latest Picotech newsletter that there is now a beta of Picoscope for Linux, I knew I had to take it for a spin.

Installing Picoscope on Linux Mint 15

Picotech’s installation process is built on apt packaging system, so a Debian-based Linux distro is the easiest installation target. This includes the wildly popular Ubuntu and Linux Mint distros, which means mainstream Linux users are well catered to. In Picotech forums, the beta thread had at least one user who extracted necessary stuff from the .deb packages and installed the software for Fedora, too.

In Debian-based Mint, the installation went without any hiccups just by following the instructions at Picotech’s Linux Drivers page. Note that sudo apt-get install picoscope also installs all drivers so you don’t need to install your model-specific driver separately. Essentially the installation is just:

sudo echo deb http://labs.picotech.com/debian picoscope main >> /etc/apt/sources.list
wget -O - http://labs.picotech.com/debian/dists/picoscope/Release.gpg.key | sudo apt-key add -
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install picoscope

Continue reading Picoscope Beta for Linux

PicoScope 3206B Review

As I mentioned earlier, I got a PicoScope 3206B back in August. After a few months of use I have gathered enough experience with it to feel qualified to write a review on the device.

Those who haven’t yet done so, I suggest you to check out my earlier review of PicoScope 2204 – it covers a bit of my rationale for a USB scope, and the basic features of Picoscope software, which is the same for the whole PicoScope product line.

The 3206B is the top-of-the-line two-channel scope in the 3000 series. The prices have dropped a bit after the introduction of mixed signal version 3206B MSO, so for $1320, you’ll get this device with fairly impressive key feature set:

  • Two channels, and external trigger line
  • 200 MHz analog bandwith
  • 500 MS/s sampling rate
  • A huge 128 MS sample buffer
  • Arbitary waveform function generator (20 MS/s)
  • Two 250 MHz probes, storage bag and software CD

For full details, I suggest you to look up the 3200 series spec sheet from Picotech’s website. Let’s get started!

Unpacking the box

Picotech ships from UK and within EU, no additional taxes or import fees need to be paid. Both my deliveries from them have arrived promptly within two days, well packaged and in impeccable condition.

The scope comes in a cardboard box that also has space for the probes, a storage bag and software CD. Nothing too fancy, but works well for longer term storage, too.
Continue reading PicoScope 3206B Review

Picotech sponsorship & Site updates

I have some great news regarding the site. As long time readers probably remember, I’ve done several hacks with my Picoscope 2204 in the past, including a $5 logic analyzer and the latest composite video decoding article. Since I really like their product, I contacted Picotech and asked if they would be interested in working together more closely.

To my delight, the friendly people at Picotech had also noticed the hacks and agreed to sponsor the Code and Life with the extremely capable Picoscope 3206B. In return, I’ve added a “Sponsored by” box to the right which features Picotech and their Picoscope products, and will continue to feature Picoscope-related stuff in the future, and they’ll also have the permission to use those articles on their own. My warmest thanks to Picotech for their donation!

The first concrete result of the new, beefier 200 MHz scope is that I was able to redo many of the measurements in my Raspberry Pi GPIO benchmark. While excellent otherwise, my older Picoscope 2204 with 10 MHz bandwith and 100 MS/s sampling rate was not capable of analyzing the 14-22 MHz waveforms generated by the Pi very accurately, while this was no problem for the 3206B which has 10x the maximum sampling rate: See Benchmarking Raspberry Pi GPIO Speed for details!

Now that I have a scope with more buffer memory, I’m also going to revisit the composite video decoding and see if I can get full resolution, maybe even colors out of my Raspberry Pi composite output using the 3206B. After I get some experience with the new scope, I’ll likely do a review similar to my previous Picoscope 2204 review.