Aladdin: USB password generator-inspired project at Indiegogo

I’ve been quite busy with work and had a few fully booked weekends, so no updates in a while. Well, it’s going to change now, as I have two more updates in the pipeline already! The first one is an interesting project that’ll surely interest those that have read my USB tutorials: Alvin Chang has started a USB password generator project at indiegogo!

Mr. Chang’s project is inspired my USB password generator hack, and builds upon the (GPL licensed) codebase it also used. Many people have expressed the desire to get the USB password generator as a ready-made device, so if you’re one of those, check out the project and decide yourself if you want to participate funding in the Aladdin key project:

Aladdin: The Key to Your Computer at indiegogo.com

Note: I’m associated with the project only via the DIY password generator hack that the project is partly based on (basic hardware design and source code).

USB password generator PCB

The most popular project of all time at Code and Life has been my DIY USB password generator. When I made it, I used a piece of veroboard that just fit inside a USB memory stick enclosure. Well, guess what: Benjamin Lunt just recently designed a custom PCB for it! I’ve been exchanging e-mails with him (Ben has written a book on USB, another very popular topic also in my blog) and he was kind enough to ship me one of these neat boards. Here’s what it looked like:

In addition to a nice USB connector footprint, this design also has a green power LED and a red transmission LED (which needs a small firmware change). Once assembled, the thing is really tiny, and it does work great. Thanks a lot for Mr. Lunt for designing this one! Be sure to visit his blog, as he’s interested if anyone would also like to have one (I know I did :). Maybe he’ll even publish the design files if someone wants to tinker with it (of course making your own isn’t too hard either).

On the right you can see what mine looked after some soldering (click for a larger image) – I love the fact that small resistors from Partco all had different base color for different values… I had to compromise a bit and use 48 ohm resistors instead of 58, and 4k7 instead of 2k2. For the LEDs, I used 480 ohms.