IR signal recorder with Arduino Uno

I’ve been tinkering with IR and the TSOP38238 IR receiver modules I got from Adafruit and Sparkfun. That’s right, plural, as I burned the first one — be REALLY sure not to mix ground and VCC with this one! I ordered 10 more from AliExpress just to make sure I have spares in case I burn my second one as well…

There are IR libraries for Arduino already, but they were a bit complex to my taste, as I’m first planning just to record one IR code from my bulky Sony projector remote and make a small trinket to send that on button press. The TSOP382 already demodulates the signal, so I just want to record the times the remote IR led is on, off, on, off, and so on. So I made an Arduino sketch to do just that: Count loop cycles, detect when signal goes from high (no IR signal detected) to low and vice versa:
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Giving Raspberry Pi Camera Nearsight with Reading Glasses

Raspberry Pi with Reading Glasses

Back again! The summer holidays gave me some time to write after a long hiatus, and this time it’s a Raspberry Pi related article. I’ve had the excellent opportunity to play around with a Raspberry Pi Camera Module for a few days. Or actually modules, as I got both the normal and NoIR without IR filter (more about that later) from Farnell / Element 14. They also stock an excellent selection of Pi accessories, so be sure to check those out, too.

But without further ado, let’s get onward. I’m still thinking up cool projects to do with the camera, so if you have nice ideas, please feel free to share them in the comments section!

Unboxing and First Impressions

Raspberry Pi IR camera and a normal one

The camera modules arrived in simple boxes, branded with element14 logo and URL. A nice additional touch was an included instruction sheet outlining the installation procedure, as well as a link to www.element14.com/picamera with further info.

Both the IR-filtered (the one showing normal visible light) and the NoIR (the one without the filter, and thus showing both normal light AND infrared) have exact same outward appearance. The installation was quite easy, but the flat cable offers less positioning and flexing freedom that your standard webcam – obviously the Pi camera is meant for more integrated installations.

Raspberry Pi camera electronics
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