DIY ATtiny45/85 ISP Header

ATtiny ISP header in practice

A quick weekend tip for a change, I thought to share a nice small soldering project will make programming ATtiny45 and ATtiny85-based projects a flash:

Basically I took a piece of veroboard, soldered some extra long pin headers on the bottom so it will form a tent of sorts above a ATtiny45/85 attached to a breadboard project. Then I soldered a 6-pin header to attach the ISP programming cable to, and used short pieces of jumper wire to route the header pins to correct ATtiny85 pins.

Now whenever I need to flash a ATtiny45/85 project sitting on a breadboard, I can just put this on top of that and never need to look up the pin layout again!

DIY ISP header closeup

You can click the images for larger versions. I’ve also been quite busy with my PS/2 projects, so I have some nice material to share regarding that when I have some free time again in my hands!

USB password generator PCB

The most popular project of all time at Code and Life has been my DIY USB password generator. When I made it, I used a piece of veroboard that just fit inside a USB memory stick enclosure. Well, guess what: Benjamin Lunt just recently designed a custom PCB for it! I’ve been exchanging e-mails with him (Ben has written a book on USB, another very popular topic also in my blog) and he was kind enough to ship me one of these neat boards. Here’s what it looked like:

In addition to a nice USB connector footprint, this design also has a green power LED and a red transmission LED (which needs a small firmware change). Once assembled, the thing is really tiny, and it does work great. Thanks a lot for Mr. Lunt for designing this one! Be sure to visit his blog, as he’s interested if anyone would also like to have one (I know I did :). Maybe he’ll even publish the design files if someone wants to tinker with it (of course making your own isn’t too hard either).

On the right you can see what mine looked after some soldering (click for a larger image) – I love the fact that small resistors from Partco all had different base color for different values… I had to compromise a bit and use 48 ohm resistors instead of 58, and 4k7 instead of 2k2. For the LEDs, I used 480 ohms.

V-USB with ATtiny45 / ATtiny85 without a crystal

One guy at Hack a Day remarked on the long wire runs in my V-USB tutorial breadboard setup. So I thought I’d build upon the part 4 of the tutorial but modify the setup a bit to run the AVR at 5 volts and use zener diodes to drop D+/D- voltage, thus eliminating the need for a regulator. And why not stop there. ATtiny45 and ATtiny85 are smaller than ATtiny2313 and have an internal oscillator that can be calibrated to provide 16.5 MHz clock, accurate enough for V-USB to do its magic. I challenge anyone to drastically shorten these wire runs!

In the photo, I used a 4-pin header to show the place of the USB cable so the zener diodes would not get obstructed. Note that due to the angle it can seem like the 0.1 uF tantalum cap (light brown one) is wired to PB4 when it really is going to GND pin! Here’s the schematic, heavily borrowed from V-USB’s EasyLogger reference implementation:
Continue reading V-USB with ATtiny45 / ATtiny85 without a crystal